Reevaluating Your Rates for the Coming Year?

(www.inkthinkerblog.com) — If rates are on your mind, be sure to check out James Chartrand’s rate-setting series at Business Tips for Writers in the Freelance Writing Jobs Network:

Why You Shouldn’t Ask for a Raise

We all want more in life. More freedom, more fun, more money… It’s perfectly fine to want these advancements and a better life, and it’s perfectly acceptable to ask for these “mores” from others.

We could ask a partner for help to lessen our workload. We could find a friend and ask if that person wants to join some activity. We could ask clients for a wage increase on the work we do. Nothing ventured, nothing gained, after all.

But I believe there are times when you shouldn’t ask for more – especially when it comes to money. Read More >>>

How to Find the Confidence to Ask for a Raise

Last week we discussed circumstances when you shouldn’t ask for a raise, but there are definitely times when you should seek out that pay hike to better compensate yourself for a job well done.

The problem is that many people feel very uncomfortable discussing the subject of pay increases and money with their clients. Most writers don’t enjoy the game of negotiations, and they end up never asking for anything at all. They get stuck in a rut and stay there for a long, long time.

Why, though? What makes people stop themselves for asking for more money, especially when the situation proves a pay hike is deserved? Read More >>>

Figuring Out A Good Pay Rate for Writing

The pay rate of writers is a hot topic. With the wide range of pay rates for various types of writing, no one can really figure out what they should be charging or what they should be paid for their words.

Sure, we can all cry for industry standards and level out the playing field so that both clients and writers know what the going rate should be. It’s not going to happen anytime soon, unfortunately.

There are way too many factors involve in different types of writing for people to set a standard rate. Both print and web content pay rates vary according to readership, subscription numbers, types of articles, the amount of research… the list goes on. Read More >>>

Taking Baby Steps for a Better Pay Rate for Writing

Many writers struggle with the decision of pay rate. What is a good pay rate for a writer? What amount is my work worth? What can I get paid for my writing? What are others getting paid? How do I compare? What rates for writing should I set?

Oy. That’s a bunch of questions and they can be stressful ones to answer, creating a situation of doubt, worry and a dip in confidence.

I say, forget that. Instead of deciding your own pay rate, let your clients decide for you. How? Using baby steps and the ‘no’ point. Read More >>>

Preparing Yourself for Better Writing Rates

Once you’ve decided to establish rates for writing that compensate you fairly for your time and effort, you need to start standing up for yourself and putting your foot down.

That’s not easy. Many freelancers hold themselves back from setting better rates because they’re afraid of what people will say. But remember, fear holds us back from getting us what we want in life.

Some temporary discomfort can often bring us great benefits.

To better prepare you to command the rates you want, here are some tips on dealing with some negative circumstances you may have to face. Read More >>>

What’s the best advice you ever received about rates? Leave a comment or share a link!

Contents Copyright © 2006-2014 Kristen King

 

4 comments… add one
  • Lori Dec 2, 2008

    Best advice I ever received was from our dear Anne Wayman. She said, and I can confirm, that the moment you raise rates the caliber of your clientele goes up. Sure, you lose a few bargain shoppers, but you gain serious clients who know the value of good writing and editing (or at least you lessen the number of shmucks in your life).

  • Deb Ng Dec 6, 2008

    James wrote a great and helpful series. I think many freelancers are afraid to raise rates because they may lose work. But the clients they gain with more the higher pay will more than make up for the loss. It can be hard to find the confidence to raise rates, but once you start receiving those good pay checks the confidence comes back in droves.

    Deb Ng´s last blog post..Can Community Ever Be a Bad Thing?

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